Small World

From the box: “Small World is a zany, light-hearted civilization game in which 2-5 players vie for conquest and control of a board that is simply too small to accommodate them all. Picking the right combination of fantasy races and unique special powers, players must rush to expand their empires – often at the expense of weaker neighbors. Yet they must also know when to push their own over-extended civilization into decline and ride a new one to victory. Designed by Philippe Keyaerts, as the fantasy follow-up to his award-winning Vinci, Small World is inhabited by a cast of characters such as dwarves, wizards, amazons, giants, orcs and even humans; who use their troops to occupy territory and conquer adjacent lands in order to push the other races off the face of the earth. Small World marks the return of the Days of Wonder line of heavily-themed, big-box sized games featuring evocative illustrations, high-quality European components and a compelling, fun theme. ”

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Lanterns

From the box: “Place tiles, adorn the Palace lake, and dedicate lanterns in this beautiful, fast–paced board game set in Imperial China. 36 lake tiles 56 lantern cards 20 engraved wood favor tokens 30 dedication tokens 1 custom wooden fishing boat rulebook the harvest is in, and now it’s time to celebrate! lanterns: the harvest festival is a tile– placement game set in Imperial China. Players act as artisans decorating the Palace lake with floating lanterns. The artisan who earns the most honor before the festival arrives wins the game.”

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Santorini

 

 

From the box: “Build Like A Mortal – Win Like a God

Do you have what it takes to join the pantheon of winners? Build like a mortal and win like a God in the game of Santorini! Created by mathematician and educator Gordon Hamilton, this pure strategy game requires players to sharpen their wits! Everyone can gather around Santorini and face-off in a build-to-the-finish.”

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Game Night at Moonjava, Mar 1

“Wood for sheep?” “Should I excavate or get water?” “Who had my wheat?”

Meet new games and new game players at our next Moonjava event. Based on the February event, we’re moving the time up to 5:30 so Terraforming Mars can actually start and finish in one play session. If you’re not up for such a heavy hitter, that’s okay — we’ll have all our fun games including King of Tokyo, Takenoko, Kingdomino, and 5 Minute Dungeon for about a half hour of fun each.

As always, it’s $5 per person for unlimited games and Moonjava will have their delicious treats on hand. Bring a friend or make one when you get here 🙂

Takenoko

From the box: “A long time ago at the Japanese Imperial court, the Chinese Emperor offered a giant panda bear as a symbol of peace to the Japanese Emperor. Since then, the Japanese Emperor has entrusted his court members (the players) with the difficult task of caring for the animal by tending to his bamboo garden.

In Takenoko, the players will cultivate land plots, irrigate them, and grow one of the three species of bamboo (Green, Yellow and Pink) with the help of the Imperial gardener to maintain this bamboo garden. They will have to bear with the immoderate hunger of this sacred animal for the juicy and tender bamboo. The player who manages his land plots best, growing the most bamboo while feeding the delicate appetite of the panda, will win the game.”

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Games for the Road

We’re a camping and picnicking family, and we like to pack a game or two in case things slow down. We’d much rather play a game when waiting in an unexpected line or at a restaurant; it keeps the noses out of the phones.

How do we pick a portable game? First, it needs to have a small footprint. After taking away the box and rulebooks, the remaining pieces need to fit neatly into a small space. This is especially important in the camper, where space is at a premium. Second, it needs to to play on almost any surface. We may find ourselves on a picnic table, but we’re also likely to be sitting on a beach blanket or around a neat sheet near the Washington Monument. Minatures and counter cubes are not right for that environment. Finally, it needs replay value. Games that can be played repeatedly and still be entertaining are key.

Here are some of our favorite traveling games:

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Tsuro

From the box: “Create your own journey with Tsuro, the Game of the Path. Place a tile and slide your stone along the path created, but take care. Other player’s paths can lead you in the wrong direction – or off the board entirely. Find your way wisely to succed. Stay the path – your journey begins here.”

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Kingdomino

From the box: “Players take on the role of Lords seeking new lands to expand their kingdom. As with ‘Dominoes’, these new lands must match the landscape tiles that have already been played. You need to create large areas of the same landscape type. But these will only score points if there is at least one crown on a tile. Points for each landscape type are calculated at the end of the game by multiplying these two together: so the number of squares times the number of crowns. Before this however, you’ll need to pay attention to your choice of tile, which decides the order of play for the following round. Taking a good tile now means you’ll play later next time. Each round presents the players with new important decisions as to which tile they should take.”

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Patchwork

From the box: “Two players compete to make the best quilt! In the past, it was a way to make use of leftover pieces of cloth to create clothing and quilts. Today, patchwork is a form of art, in which the designers use precious fabrics to create beautiful textiles. To create a beautiful quilt, however, requires effort and time, but the available patches just do not want to fit together. So choose your patches carefully and keep a healthy supply of buttons to not only finish your quilt, but to make it better and more beautiful than your opponent‘s.”

Dan says: “Patchwork is a nice little tile-laying game for two players.  In it you’re buying  and placing patches of various Tetris-like shapes onto your square tableau.  The play is ‘timed’ against a spiral board where your pawns move toward the center.  Each ‘patch’ has a potential button and ‘time’/movement cost, so picking which of 3 available patches to buy has to measure the cost against the gain, including its fit in your tableau and the buttons it can earn you.  Quick to pick up with lots of replay value, this game is a great 2-player game.”

Amazon: Patchwork

Forbidden Desert

From the box: “Gear up for a thrilling adventure to recover a legendary flying machine buried deep in the ruins of an ancient desert city. You’ll need to coordinate with your teammates and use every available resource if you hope to survive the scorching heat and relentless sandstorm. Find the flying machine and escape before you all become permanent artifacts of the forbidden desert!

In Forbidden Desert, players take on the roles of brave adventurers who must throw caution to the wind and survive both blistering heat and blustering sand in order to recover a legendary flying machine buried under an ancient desert city. While featuring cooperative gameplay similar to Forbidden Island, Forbidden Desert is a fresh, new game based around an innovative set of mechanisms such as an ever-shifting board, individual resource management, and a unique method for locating the flying machine parts.” Continue reading “Forbidden Desert”